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City Manager’s Weekly Report for week ending April 19, 2019

City Manager’s Weekly Report
for week ending April 19, 2019

Wooden Signs. By now, you’ve noticed all but one of the historic wooden signs taken down due to deterioration are back in place. The furthest north and south reaches of Normandy Park are demarcated. All other signs are on federally classified arterial roadways, the main east-west access points into Normandy Park. We are anticipating replacing one more sign on 202nd, if we can establish a legal location that meets roadway standards. Did you know that the signs are representations of the boundary of Normandy Park?

Quiet Skies Meeting. Thursday, April 25, 6:00-PM-8PM, at the Highline Performing Arts Center in Burien. Representative Adam Smith will be in attendance. The World Health Organization will share information. The noise standard maintained by the State of Washington for decades is 65 dnl (dbl in some decades); environmental assessment for the airport uses this 65 dnl as a benchmark and has adhered to a noise reduction standard of 45 dnl for homes with noise reduction improvements. The WHO, however, has found that 40 dnl is necessary for an undisturbed night’s sleep, and further, that disturbed sleep has serious health consequences. I encourage Council members and interested residents to attend this meeting. I’ll be there.

2020 U.S. Census is a big deal. The U.S. Census is mandated by the Constitution and provides vital data for the nation. Census data are used, among other purposes, to apportion the seats of the U.S. House of Representatives; redraw congressional districts in each state; and allocate billions of dollars each year for federal financial assistance. Further, businesses use census data to market new services and products, and to tailor existing ones to demographic changes. The Bureau is seeking to control the cost of the census, which has been escalating with each decade. The 2020 Census is now estimated to cost approximately $15.6 billion. Moreover, the average cost for counting a housing unit increased from about $16 in 1970 to around $92 in 2010 (in 2020 constant dollars), in part because the nation’s population is increasingly difficult to count. In addition, because the 2020 Census involves collecting personal information from over a hundred million households, the Census Bureau will be busy addressing potential system security weaknesses, assuring that risks are at an acceptable level before systems are deployed. The census provides data that the federal government uses to guide the distribution of federal funding to states, local jurisdictions, and households across the nation. The census only happens once every 10 years and it’s a big deal.

Mark E. Hoppen, City Manager
City of Normandy Park
801 SW 174th Street
Normandy Park, WA 98166
(206) 248-8246 (Direct Phone)